Transportation For States

ABCC India Project Cargo Corporation


        Jammu and Kashmir  is a state in northern India, often denoted by the acronym J&K. It is located mostly in the Himalayan mountains, and shares borders with the states of Himachal Pradesh and Punjab to the south. Jammu and Kashmir has an international border with China in the north and east, and the Line of Control separates it from the Pakistani-administered territories of Azad Kashmir and Gilgit-Baltistan in the west and northwest respectively. The state has special autonomy under Article 370 of the Constitution of India.
           A part of the erstwhile Princely State of Kashmir and Jammu, the region is the subject of a territorial conflict among China, India and Pakistan. The western districts of the former princely state known as Azad Kashmirand the northern territories known as Gilgit-Baltistan have been under Pakistani control since 1947. The Aksai Chin region in the east, bordering Tibet, has been under Chinese control since 1962.
                                         Jammu and Kashmir consists of three regions: Jammu, the Kashmir Valley and LadakhSrinagar is the summer capital, and Jammu is the winter capital. Jammu and Kashmir is the only state in India with a Muslim-majority population. The Kashmir valley is famous for its beautiful mountainous landscape, and Jammu's numerous shrines attract tens of thousands of Hindu pilgrims every year. Ladakh, also known as "Little Tibet", is renowned for its remote mountain beauty andBuddhist culture.
                Maharaja Hari Singh became the ruler of the princely state of Jammu and Kashmir in 1925, and he was the reigning monarch at the conclusion of the British rule in the subcontinent in 1947. With the impending independence of India, the British announced that the British Paramountcy over the princely states would end, and the states were free to choose between the new Dominions of India and Pakistan or to remain independent. It was emphasised that independence was only a `theoretical possibility' because, during the long rule of the British in India, the states had come to depend on British Indian government for a variety of their needs including their internal and external security.
                       Jammu and Kashmir is home to several valleys such as the Kashmir Valley, Tawi Valley, Chenab Valley, Poonch Valley, Sind Valley and Lidder Valley. The main Kashmir Valley is 100 km (62 mi) wide and 15,520.3 km2 (5,992.4 sq mi) in area. The Himalayas divide the Kashmir valley from Ladakh while the Pir Panjal range, which encloses the valley from the west and the south, separates it from the Great Plains of northern India. Along the northeastern flank of the Valley runs the main range of the Himalayas. This densely settled and beautiful valley has an average height of 1,850 metres (6,070 ft) above sea-level but the surrounding Pir Panjal range has an average elevation of 5,000 metres (16,000 ft).
                               Because of Jammu and Kashmir's wide range of elevations, itsbiogeography is diverse. Northwestern thorn scrub forests andHimalayan subtropical pine forests are found in the low elevations of the far southwest. These give way to a broad band of western Himalayan broadleaf forests running from northwest-southeast across the Kashmir Valley. Rising into the mountains, the broadleaf forests grade into western Himalayan subalpine conifer forests. Above the tree line are foundnorthwestern Himalayan alpine shrub and meadows. Much of the northeast of the state is covered by the Karakoram-West Tibetan Plateau alpine steppe. Around the highest elevations, there is no vegetation, simply rock and ice.
          The Jhelum River is the only major Himalayan river which flows through the Kashmir valley. The IndusTawiRavi and Chenab are the major rivers flowing through the state. Jammu and Kashmir is home to several Himalayan glaciers. With an average altitude of 5,753 metres (18,875 ft) above sea-level, the Siachen Glacier is 76 km (47 mi) long making it the longest Himalayan glacier.
        The climate of Jammu and Kashmir varies greatly owing to its rugged topography. In the south around Jammu, the climate is typically monsoonal, though the region is sufficiently far west to average 40 to 50 mm (1.6 to 2 inches) of rain per month between January and March. In the hot season, Jammu city is very hot and can reach up to 40 °C (104 °F) whilst in July and August, very heavy though erratic rainfall occurs with monthly extremes of up to 650 millimetres (25.5 inches). In September, rainfall declines, and by October conditions are hot but extremely dry, with minimal rainfall and temperatures of around 29 °C (84 °F).
            Across from the Pir Panjal range, the South Asian monsoon is no longer a factor and most precipitation falls in the spring from southwest cloudbands. Because of its closeness to the Arabian Sea, Srinagar receives as much as 635 millimetres (25 in) of rain from this source, with the wettest months being March to May with around 85 millimetres (3.3 inches) per month. Across from the main Himalaya Range, even the southwest cloudbands break up and the climate of Ladakh andZanskar is extremely dry and cold. Annual precipitation is only around 100 mm (4 inches) per year and humidity is very low. In this region, almost all above 3,000 metres (9,750 ft) above sea level, winters are extremely cold. In Zanskar, the average January temperature is −20 °C (−4 °F) with extremes as low as −40 °C (−40 °F). All the rivers freeze over and locals make river crossings during this period because their high levels from glacier melt in summer inhibits crossing. In summer in Ladakh and Zanskar, days are typically a warm 20 °C (68 °F), but with the low humidity and thin air nights can still be cold.
                Jammu and Kashmir consists of three divisions: Jammu, Kashmir Valley and Ladakh, and is further divided into 22 districts. The Siachen Glacier, although under Indian military control, does not lie under the administration of the state of Jammu and Kashmir. KishtwarRambanReasiSamba,BandiporaGanderbalKulgam and Shopian are newly formed districts
             The major ethnic groups living in Jammu and Kashmir include Kashmiris,Gujjars/Bakarwals, Paharis, Dogras and Ladakhis. The Kashmiris live mostly in the main valley of Kashmir and Chenab valley of Jammu division with a minority living in the Pir Panjal region. The Pahari-speaking people mostly live in and around the Pir Panjal region with some in the northern Kashmir valley. The nomadic Gujjars and Bakerwals practice transhumance and mostly live in the Pirpanjal region. The Dogras are ethnically, linguistically and culturally related to the neighbouring Punjabi people and mostly live in the Udhampur and Jammudistricts of the state. The Ladakhis are people of Mongoloid stock and resemble in their ethnic character to the neighbouring Tibetan people.
             Jammu and Kashmir's economy is predominantly dependent on agriculture and allied activities. The Kashmir valley is known for its sericulture and cold-water fisheries. Wood from Kashmir is used to make high-quality cricket bats, popularly known as Kashmir Willow. Kashmiri saffron is very famous and brings the state a handsome amount of foreign exchange. Agricultural exports from Jammu and Kashmir include apples, barley, cherries, corn, millet, oranges, rice, peaches, pears, saffron, sorghum, vegetables, and wheat, while manufactured exports include handicrafts, rugs, and shawls.
         Horticulture plays a vital role in the economic development of the state. With an annual turnover of over 3 billion (US$45 million), apart from foreign exchange of over 800 million (US$12 million), this sector is the next biggest source of income in the state's economy. The region of Kashmir is known for its horticulture industry and is the wealthiest region in the state.  Horticultural produce from the state includes apples, apricots, cherries, pears, plums, almonds and walnuts.
           The Doda district has deposits of high-grade sapphire. Though small, the manufacturing and services sector is growing rapidly, especially in the Jammu division. In recent years, several consumer goods companies have opened manufacturing units in the region. The Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry of India (ASSOCHAM) has identified several industrial sectors which can attract investment in the state, and accordingly, it is working with the union and the state government to set up industrial parks and special economic zones. In the fiscal year 2005–06, exports from the state amounted to 11.5 billion (US$170 million). However, industrial development in the state faces several major constraints including extreme mountainous landscape and power shortage. The Jammu & Kashmir Bank, which is listed as a S&P CNX 500 conglomerate, is based in the state. It reported a net profit of 598 million (US$8.9 million) in 2008.
            The Government of India has been keen to economically integrate Jammu and Kashmir with the rest of India. The state is one of the largest recipients of grants from New Delhi, totalling US$812 million per year. It has a mere 4% incidence of poverty, one of the lowest in the country.
             In an attempt to improve the infrastructure in the state, Indian Railways is constructing the ambitious Kashmir Railwayproject at a cost of more than US$2.5 billion. Trains run on the 130 km Baramula-Banihal section. The 17.5 km Qazigund-Banihal section through the 11 km long Pir Panjal Railway Tunnel was commissioned. Udhampur-Katra section of the track was commissioned early in July 2014. The Katra-Banihal section is under construction. The route crosses major earthquake zones, and is subjected to extreme temperatures of cold and heat, as well as inhospitable terrain, making it an extremely challenging engineering project. It is expected to increase tourism and travel to Kashmir. Three other railway lines, the Bilaspur–Mandi–Leh railwaySrinagar-Kargil-Leh railway and the Jammu-Poonch railway have been proposed.
       Before the insurgency intensified in 1989, tourism formed an important part of the Kashmiri economy. The tourism economy in the Kashmir valley was worst hit. However, the holy shrines of Jammu and the Buddhist monasteries of Ladakh continue to remain popular pilgrimage and tourism destinations. Every year, thousands of Hindu pilgrims visit holy shrines of Vaishno Devi and Amarnath, which has had significant impact on the state's economy. It was estimated in 2007 that the Vaishno Devi yatra contributed 4.75 billion (US$71 million) to the local economy annually a few years ago. The contribution should be significantly greater now as the numbers of Indian visitors have increased considerably. Foreign tourists have been slower to return. The British government still advises against all travel to Jammu and Kashmir with the exception of the cities of Jammu and Srinagar, travel between these two cities on the Jammu-Srinagar highway, and the region of Ladakh, while Canada excludes the entire region excepting Leh.
            Besides Kashmir, several areas in the Jammu region have a lot of tourist potential as well. Bhau Fort in Jammu city is the major attraction for the tourists visiting that city. Bage-e-Bahu is another tourist destination. The local aquarium, established by the fisheries department, is visited by many. Tourists from across India visit Jammu in a pilgrimage to Mata Vaishno Devi. Mata Vaishno Devi is located in the Trikuta Hills, about 40 to 45 km from Jammu City. Approximately 10 million Pilgrims visit this holy place every year.
         Tourism in the Kashmir valley has rebounded in recent years, and in 2009, the state became one of the top tourist destinations of India. Gulmarg, one of the most popular ski resort destinations in India, is also home to the world's highest green golf course. The state's recent decrease in violence has boosted the economy and tourism. It was reported that more than a million tourists visited Kashmir in 2011.
        Ladakh is famous for its unique Indo-Tibetan culture. Chanting in Sanskrit and Tibetan language forms an integral part of Ladakh's Buddhist lifestyle. Annual masked dance festivals, weaving and archery are an important part of traditional life in Ladakh. Ladakhi food has much in common with Tibetan food, the most prominent foods beingthukpa, noodle soup; and tsampa, known in Ladakhi as Ngampe, roasted barley flour. Typical garb includes gonchas of velvet, elaborately embroidered waistcoats and boots, and gonads or hats. People adorned with gold and silver ornaments and turquoise headgears throng the streets during Ladakhi festivals.
          The Dumhal is a famous dance in the Kashmir Valley, performed by men of the Wattal region. The women perform the Rouff, another traditional folk dance. Kashmir has been noted for its fine arts for centuries, including poetry and handicrafts. Shikaras, traditional small wooden boats, and houseboats are a common feature in lakes and rivers across the Valley.
           The Constitution of India does not allow people from regions other than Jammu and Kashmir to purchase land in the state. As a consequence, houseboats became popular among those who were unable to purchase land in the Valley and has now become an integral part of the Kashmiri lifestyle.
           Kawa, traditional green tea with spices and almond, is consumed all through the day in the chilly winter climate of Kashmir. Most of the buildings in the Valley and Ladakh are made from softwood and are influenced by IndianTibetan, andIslamic architecture.
        Jammu's Dogra culture and tradition is very similar to that of neighbouringPunjab and Himachal Pradesh. Traditional Punjabi festivals such as Lohri andVaisakhi are celebrated with great zeal and enthusiasm throughout the region, along with Accession Day, an annual holiday which commemorates the accession of Jammu & Kashmir to the Dominion of India. After DograsGujjars form the second-largest ethnic group in Jammu. Known for their semi-nomadic lifestyle, Gujjars are also found in large numbers in the Kashmir Valley. Similar to Gujjars, Gaddis are primarily herdsmen who hail from the Chamba region in Himachal Pradesh. Gaddis are generally associated with emotive music played on the flute. The Bakkarwalas found both in Jammu and the Kashmir valley are wholly nomadic pastoral people who move along the Himalayan slopes in search for pastures for their huge flocks of goats and sheep.
       Jammu and Kashmir is India's most sensitive state. Here are some of the meanest people, public life became miserable and horrible. Due to adverse environment also affected the transport system is always here. Which have to be taken here for transporting Extreme efficiency.

Villages-6768

District- 22

Capital – (Srinagar ,Jammu)

Area- 222,236 km2

Population – 12,541,302

Language- Kashmiri ,dogri,hindi ,Punjabi ,Ladakhi .

Industries- 200 more advance industries.

Rivers-
Chenab River,Doda River,Dras River,Indus River,Jhelum River,Nubra River,Ravi River,Shayok River,Shingo River,Shyok River,Suru River (Indus),Tawi River,Tsarap River,Yapola River,Zanskar Gorge,Bringhi River,Chip Chap River,Galwan River,Lidder River ,Markha River (India),Nala Palkhu,Neelum River,Nubra River,Poonch River,Rambi Ara,Ravi River,Sandran River,Ujh River,Veshaw River,Zanskar River.




Checkpost- Lakhanpur  ,LOWER MUNDA , Check Post Passenger Side Rly. Station .


Checkpost website-  www.jkcomtax.nic.in


State website- www.jk.gov.in


STATE
NO. OF INVOICE COPY REQUIRED
ENTRY TAX
OCTROI
INBOND FORM / PERMIT
OUTBOND FORM / PERMIT
REMARK
Jammu & Kashmir
3
Yes
No
Form No - 65
Form No - 65
Form VAT 62, 63, Acknowledgement for delivery of goods. Delivery note to be submitted by dealer in VAT 59 & any other person in VAT 61 & Waybill in Form 58. Entry tax is applicable in case value of good >5000.00


Business transparency, friendly cooperation, ultra efficiency, proper guidance and highest conclusion is our definition.
                            We are indigenous 36 states 686 districts 5,93,731 fluent in villages, planned, regular, economical and reliable pre-eminent service providers we have listed revered. Transport business department of our organization because of its quality is the pre-eminent place.
 Business transparency, friendly cooperation, ultra efficiency, proper guidance and highest conclusion is our definition.
                            We are indigenous 36 states 686 districts 5,93,731 fluent in villages, planned, regular, economical and reliable pre-eminent service providers we have listed revered. Transport business department of our organization because of its quality is the pre-eminent place.


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Transport  for Jammu & Kashmir
Transport  for Jammu
Transport  for Doda
Transport  for Kathua
Transport  for Kishtwar
Transport  for Poonch
Transport  for Rajouri
Transport  for Ramban
Transport  for Reasi
Transport  for Samba
Transport  for Udhampur
Transport  for  Kashmir Valley
Transport  for Anantnag
Transport  for Bandipora
Transport  for Baramulla
Transport  for Budgam
Transport  for Ganderbal
Transport  for Kulgam
Transport  for Kupwara 
Transport  for Pulwama
Transport  for Shopian
Transport  for Srinagar
Transport  for  Ladakh
Transport  for Kargil
Transport  for Leh





Transport  In Jammu & Kashmir
Transport  In Jammu
Transport  In Doda
Transport In Kathua
Transport  In Kishtwar
Transport  In Poonch
Transport  In Rajouri
Transport  In Ramban
Transport  In Reasi
Transport  In Samba
Transport  In Udhampur
Transport In  Kashmir Valley
Transport In Anantnag
Transport  In Bandipora
Transport  In Baramulla
Transport  In Budgam
Transport  In Ganderbal
Transport  In Kulgam
Transport  In Kupwara 
Transport  In Pulwama
Transport  In Shopian
Transport  In Srinagar
Transport  In  Ladakh
Transport  In Kargil
Transport  In Leh